Do It Yourself Supercomputing in Linux Part 1

If you recently purchased a laptop or desktop computer, chances are you have a dual core system. There does not seem to be any indication anymore of us going back to single core unless some technological breakthrough will break the power barrier of CPUs. This means that more and more people will have a high powered computer in their homes without any idea how to harness such power.

What does it mean to have a dual processor? On first impulse, you probably will think it will speed up the execution of your programs. You would probably perceive a significant difference between the response time of your programs in a single core versus a dual core. But why do programs run faster in dual processor systems? For one thing, the speed of each processor is faster as compared to older single processors. The other thing is due to symmetric multiprocessing. An analogy of the dual processor system is a bank with 2 tellers and having a single line for customers. When a teller is done with one customer, it will get the next customer from the line. You can read about the performance of multiprocessor systems in this article.

There is another way you can make use of multiprocessors to make your programs run faster. This is through parallel programming. Parallel computing has been around for a long time already but are usually confined to university laboratories or supercomputing facilities. It has not caught the interest of the common people because they have no access to such machines. However, the future is already about multi-processing. More and more of these machines will reach the masses. This means that highly talented members of the masses get to experiment with parallel computing on a day-to-day basis. We are in for another revolution in computing. Are you ready for this revolution?

Continue reading Do It Yourself Supercomputing in Linux Part 1

Advertisements

Celebrating Labor Day

It’s labor day and what a fitting way to celebrate Labor day than to work!

First order of business today was to setup the MPI (Message Passing Interface) and demo programs in my computer. Since MPI is a shared-memory distributed computing platform, I need to set it up also in another laptop. I’m glad my friend Roli Balicas agreed to let me setup his laptop. He spent about 5 hours in our house. It does not really take a long time to setup MPI in two dual-core laptops. We just spent most of the time eating pizza from Pizza Hut and watching Jet Li movies. We were able to watch two full movies while I was also setting up MPI on the two laptops.

Roli’s laptop was running Ubuntu 7.10 and is not yet configured as a developer’s laptop so I had to install xorg developer packages in order to make the MPE of MPI compile with X enabled. After upgrading his laptop, I was able to recompile MPI and compile the Mandelbrot demo. Now the two laptops can run the demo.

After Roli left, I went back to my experiments on Model-Driven Architecture. I’m looking at AndroMDA, an MDA generator and MagicDraw as UML tool. I’m enjoying my explorations into this subject. However, MDA seems to have a bleak future. A lot of heavy-weight personalities don’t see any future on MDA. See for example this. Whatever may be the case, the fact that i’m enjoying it is already enough for me.